ELD Survey: 91% Compliance Achieved by Small Carriers

Posted: 21 Mar, 2018 by Peggy Dorf


32 Comments

Categories: Trucking Regulations

Tags: CarrierOwner-OperatorBrokerShipper


The vast majority of owner-operators are ready for the ELD mandate, according to a recent survey by DAT. Many are unhappy with the electronic logs, however, which they blame for a loss of productivity and a resulting decline in income. Plus, it's harder to find parking for their trucks. Driver detention remains a problem, and shippers don't seem to be taking drivers' hours of service into account when loading and unloading, according to the survey respondents.

Read the full report from the DAT ELD and Detention Survey and download the ELD Survival Guide for CarriersNeed an ELD? Contact KeepTruckin for a demo.

 

 

DAT's survey of 645 carriers was completed on March 13. Owner-operators made up 93% of the survey respondents, who either run with an ELD (81%) or have an exemption from the mandate (10%) for a compliance rate of 91%. An additional 2% plan to install ELDs before the start of the mandate's penalty phase on April 1.

Here are some of the high points: 

Truckers With ELDs Drive Fewer Miles, Make Less Money

The carriers who use ELDs reported that 67% are driving fewer miles, and 71% are making less money, than they did before installing the devices. They're finding it more difficult to park their trucks — 26% said it was "harder" to find parking, and 61% said it was "much harder" — since the mandate took effect. Parking issues and driver detention can take up valuable time, and ELDs deprive the drivers of the flexibility they once enjoyed when recording Hours of Service on paper logs.

 

Owner-Operators Were Late to Adopt ELDs

More than half (53%) of those who are running with ELDs had installed the devices only within the past three months, and another 22% have been using the devices for less than six months, so it's fair to say that most are still getting used to the new technology. 

 

Detention Affects 77% of Truckers, on 20% of Loads or More

More than 77% of the carriers reported that their drivers are being detained for more than two hours on at least one out of five loads. They observed that shippers are not taking the drivers' hours of service into account when loading and unloading. 

 

 

 

Read the full report from the DAT ELD and Detention Survey and download our ELD Survival Guide for Carriers. Need an ELD? Contact KeepTruckin for a demo.

Leave your comments

  • profile

    Bob

    • 3/21/2018 5:19:38 PM

    I think the picture of the driver in this article could have been more thought out. It looks like the driver is on the highway driving and texting and if he is not driving , is he parked on the emergency shoulder on his phone.....no head set?

    Reply 2 comments
  • profile

    Ande Young

    • 3/22/2018 4:20:13 AM

    The whole ELD mess has exactly the opposite effect, safety wise, as intended. I found myself at a shipper for a bit over 4.5hrs. I had to decide to take the rest of the 10hrs break or drive for 7hrs I had available at the time and and take the mandatory 8hs SB. On the 2nd option I would miss my del. so I had to take the rest of the 10hrs at the shipper, during the mid day and drive all night(at this time I had 11hrs available). I made it, but for 1st time in more then 10 years, I do not recall almost one full hr of driving . I don't think I killed anybody, I did not hear anything in the news in the morning. Need I say I had to take my break in the day (I can not sleep in daylight at all). And the vicious circle continues. I'm afraid very soon a very legal driver will do something very stupid: remember Tracy Morgan?

    Reply 
  • profile

    William Erick Boahn

    • 3/22/2018 6:46:11 AM

    We gave up long haul and are phasing out our business. The mileage rates should be the avg price per gallon of fuel through states traveled but theres no protrction. The big companies bid loads for pennies so its not worth it. We stayed alive but have no money for taxes so we have to fold soon

    Reply 
  • profile

    Hellbent

    • 3/22/2018 7:35:51 AM

    I don't blame ELD's for loss of productivity or income. That's where the pencil pushers got it wrong. ELD's will be blamed for lack rest for those who drive over 600 miles and deliver the same day. Those drivers will be up against the clock and any break will not result in actual rest which defeats the purpose of the ELOG's. Also, for those who drive 600 miles and deliver same day, you are more likely to speed and drive tired just to keep from getting fired which is unsafe. This also defeats its stated purpose. Before ELOG's drivers cheated to get rest when they were actually tired. The 14 hour clock can not regulate that and therefore flawed and primed to creating for rest not for income. That's why that Wal-Mart driver kept driving while tired. His logs were accurate. He was not sleepy while on 10 hour break. He didn't get sleepy until he started driving. Now its too late to rest. And people got hurt. No regulation can tell you when you need to be sleepy or fatigued.

    Reply 1 comment
  • profile

    Denis J Langlois

    • 3/22/2018 9:25:23 AM

    Why do you report nothing but lies in saying that companies using ELD's are making more money because it is "NOT TRUE" You are nothing but LIARS and have never been involved in running a small trucking company are have never driven anything more than a Golf cart, SO STOP LYING!

    Reply 1 comment
  • profile

    Steve Braker

    • 3/22/2018 9:25:39 AM

    A couple days ago I started my day 1 minute early. That’s a violation that a DOT officer could fine me for and put me off duty. With paper logs and 15 minute increments small mistakes like that would not be a problem. Instead, I got a big red flag. Who gave the Dot the GOD like knowledge to know when I’m tired or when I need a 30 minute break to get a coffee or use the restroom? I think these people spend to much time changing things just to create more work for themselves and justify their jobs. With all the government regulations, it’s no wonder we can’t get new drivers and have to bring in foreigners.

    Reply 
  • profile

    Billy

    • 3/22/2018 2:34:00 PM

    Your damn right the shippers and receivers are still taking to long to load and unload. And they are very aware of the ELD. As every dock now has a sign posted that drivers are to leave the premises as soon as their business is finished. I’m waiting for the first driver to not budge when his 14 hours are over. So far drivers are leaving after loading or unloading. The pressure is building I see it in the drivers faces.

    Reply 
  • profile

    AMG

    • 3/23/2018 12:14:19 PM

    No Owner wants this in their truck. This was made to put us out of business & sign under one of the mega carriers

    Reply 2 comments
  • profile

    Manny Beltran

    • 3/25/2018 6:07:01 AM

    I find myself most of the time having more driving time than on-duty time left, making it less miles to drive. This is all caused by brokers, shippers, and receivers just being satisfied that the truck got there and will load or unload on there time not our ours. Government should also mandate shippers and receivers to have there time logged also, so our on-duty time can be on a real life situation and not being decided upon by a person sitting down in a third floor office in Washington D.C. .

    Reply 1 comment
  • profile

    S. Clark

    • 4/3/2018 9:22:35 AM

    I am also phasing out of over the road operations and fighting for more local work with different equipment. Its no longer a competition based on earned customer relationships and personal reputations and I do believe that this is very much a main objective of the ATA and FMCSA. It's to bad because I am the 4th generation in my family to actually raise my children while maintaining the independence owning my own one truck operation. I may soon have no choice at all but to work for one of the Large Companies myself. Well Done FMCSA you have done well utilizing so called "SAFE" regulations to allow the largest (ATA) companies to dominate the market and the lives of their drivers.

    Reply 
  • profile

    Denis J Langlois

    • 4/5/2018 7:16:20 PM

    Stop ! All the lying about how the ELD will make the roads safer because drivers are driving Faster, Longer and with less time slept than ever before ! I have driven for over 43 years and now dive more tires and more stress than ever before . I get to see my family less , I can't find a place to park when needed and have to eat unhealthy foods because there is no place made for big trucks that allow big trucks

    Reply 1 comment
  • profile

    Stephen Alish Tasen

    • 4/9/2018 1:49:56 AM

    There are a lot of situatioms which keep the 14 hour clock running....for example I had a full SB restart to deliver a drop get a trailer and then drive to the truckstop to wait for my next load which didn't come through until the next morning. Then I only had 3 hours to next pickup but need to get trailer washout and appointment time late afternoon the next day but once I start driving it starts my 14 hour clock so rather than go to shipper's town early to get washout I waited until just enough time to get there, have a washout and arrive on time at shipper with minimal time spent running the 14 hour clock. I could have drove the 3 hours the night before but then I would not have enough time in between (10 hours SB) to reset. My point is there was adequate time to rest doing nothing but not 10 hours! Seems to me waiting time should not run the 14 hr clock as we are doing no work! Hope this example makes sense. I know we can log as "Going to truck stop no load" or "personal use" etc. but I was under a load assignment.

    Reply 2 comments
  • profile

    Small Company Owner

    • 4/13/2018 8:31:28 AM

    I agree with all of the comments but especially that this is to put the small company O/O out and make the big companies have a monopoly. When that happens the country will be at the mercy of the large corporation demanding their price to have freight delivered which is why they are all for the ELD and the government interfering with the trucking HOS. More than 1 driver has said that their big company has enforced them driving when they have time available no matter whether the traffic is a mess, the weather is horrendous or the driver is fatigued. That is what you call CONTROL. By the way, the Walmart driver had driven from GA to NJ in his personal vehicle before he got into the commercial vehicle and started his time. No ELD would help that situation ever.

    Reply 
  • profile

    Promil Fernando

    • 4/13/2018 10:10:05 AM

    No regulation can tell you when you need to be sleepy or fatigued.

    Reply 
  • profile

    Reginald Montgomery

    • 4/13/2018 11:12:34 PM

    Since incorporating the use of a ELd in my truck I've been forced to drive when I'm tired, try to sleep when I'm not tired, park on the shoulder of the road, reschedule loads due to slow shippers, and turn down loads because of multiple stops even though the distance was low I would run out of hours on my 14 hour clock before completing the last stop. And the worst of all after waiting at a shipper for more than 8 hours to get loaded, I drove 3 miles to a store for food which started my clock. Now instead of have 2 hour's before my 10 hour break is up I have to start all over because now I only have 2.5 hours available on my 14 hour clock. TOTAL BS!!!! VERY UNHAPPY!!!!

    Reply 
  • profile

    John Scott

    • 4/16/2018 7:13:57 AM

    I think ELD's are simply going to hurt a industry that isn't always going to fit into a micro managed time clock system. Nothing has been addressed in terms of the negatives ELD's will affect. Such as parking problems that already existed and unrealistic shipping schedules. Not to mention many devices appear to be unreliable and provide incorrect information at times. How some of these devices got certified is a big question mark. I can say from experience my Peoplenet devices is nothing but a unreliable logger and the service people seem clueless and untrained on how to fix it.

    Reply 
  • profile

    Denis J Langlois

    • 4/16/2018 11:44:12 AM

    When are we a truck drivers and small carriers going to revolt against the ELD Mandate ? The ELD Mandate is no more than "SLAVERY" and just like the slaves we are told when to get up, when to work and how long, when to eat and for how long we have, when to drive and we have to eat fast food because you can not get home to eat healthy food with your kids and wife. We as drivers drive when exhausted because the clock started and can not sleep like it is mandated and who can sleep 10 hours in a truck sleeper ? No matter how many hours you make a driver take off he will always be tired when he can not chose when to sleep! I wonder if Congress and the American public would like it if someone came to their home and told them they had to go to bed in the middle of the day and had to stay up all night for 14 hours straight no matter what. It is time to "REVOLT" and park our trucks for 1 week and the US economy would go belly up just like that. I will not do the ELD and if you can catch me , go for it !!

    Reply 
  • profile

    Rafael

    • 4/21/2018 12:42:35 PM

    Most of Shippers and Receivers do not CARE about your time been wasted I think the way to get pay for detention and to force Shippers and Receivers is to continue getting paid at the same rate that the Load is paying for example if Load pays $1,00.00 and you took 10 hrs from when you got Loaded to your delivery appointment (RCVR) if they take 5 hrs to unload you they need to pay You $100.00 dlls per hour for every additional hour They take after the two or three hours of free time they get to unload you and they can take days if they want as long as they pay I would not care That is the regulation WE need Yes I am making less money with this ELD, the only one benefiting with this is going to be the DOT and the big Companies that have already Schedule their drivers to a Load ahead of time because they already know ahead of time their schedule. I think as a Owner Operator We should have a more flexible or adjustable log book because we dont know what we are going to do until after we deliver the load and try to find another load then we try to plan how to get it done.

    Reply 1 comment
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